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Hey DC! Tor Books is bringing me to your area for the American Library Association conference this coming weekend, and while I’m in town, I’ve signed on to do a couple of public events I hope to see you at!

On Sunday, June 27 at 3PM, I’m speaking at Red Emma’s books in Baltimore, in an event co-sponsored by the Baltimore Node hackerspace.

On Monday, June 28 at 6:30PM, I’m speaking at a special edition of DC Copynight, co-sponsored by Public Knowledge and hosted by the New America Foundation. Many thanks to Thomas “cmdln” Gideon of DC Copynight for setting this up!

Both events are free!

4 Responses to “Speaking in Washington DC area next week”

  1. Swen

    Hello Corry,

    my comment has nothing to do with this article, I just want to recommend a good read. In one of your recent interview you mentioned „the concentration camp ward’s wife dilemma” as the theme for one of your coming books.

    „Grandpa Wasn’t a Nazi: The Holocaust in German Family Remembrance” is the title of a book written by German Professor of Social Psychology Harald Welzer. His main focus is on research into memory, research into the handing on of knowledge, and research into violence. Another good title for the book would be (and here is the link to your forthcoming book) “The concentration camp ward’s children and grandchildrens non existing dilemma”.

    There is a free 42 pages summary available from the American Jewish Committee.

    From the introduction to the book:
    “Welzer interviewed forty Western and Eastern German families, both in a family setting and individually, to discover how they interpreted their objective knowledge of the history of the Third Reich in terms of their own family history.

    Almost all the younger Germans interviewed believed that their own grandparents had not been involved or had opposed the racist policies of Nazism. Even when grandparents admitted their participation in Nazi crimes, their offspring did not “hear” them or reinterpreted the stories in ways that turned their forebears into heroes. This process of “cumulative heroization” reflects the natural tendency to associate positive elements and block out negative ones for the people we love.

    But there is danger lurking in this all-too-human phenomenon. First, the story passed down by successive generations increasingly whitewashes and distorts history, so that not turning in one’s family doctor, who was Jewish, as opposed to hiding him, or giving a glass of milk to passing refugees after the war was over, is portrayed as a heroic act of resistance. Second, by separating the evil of Nazism from the good qualities associated with beloved relatives, the respondents managed to distinguish between the “Nazis,” who are “others,” and the “Germans” who were themselves victims of Nazism.

  2. Swen

    Hello Corry,

    my comment has nothing to do with this article, I just want to recommend a good read. In one of your recent interview you mentioned „the concentration camp ward’s wife dilemma” as the theme for one of your coming books.

    „Grandpa Wasn’t a Nazi: The Holocaust in German Family Remembrance” is the title of a book written by German Professor of Social Psychology Harald Welzer. His main focus is on research into memory, research into the handing on of knowledge, and research into violence. Another good title for the book would be (and here is the link to your forthcoming book) “The concentration camp ward’s children and grandchildren non existing dilemma”.

    There is a free 42 pages summary available from the American Jewish Committee:

    From the introduction to the book:
    “Welzer interviewed forty Western and Eastern German families, both in a family setting and individually, to discover how they interpreted their objective knowledge of the history of the Third Reich in terms of their own family history.

    Almost all the younger Germans interviewed believed that their own grandparents had not been involved or had opposed the racist policies of Nazism. Even when grandparents admitted their participation in Nazi crimes, their offspring did not “hear” them or reinterpreted the stories in ways that turned their forebears into heroes. This process of “cumulative heroization” reflects the natural tendency to associate positive elements and block out negative ones for the people we love.

    But there is danger lurking in this all-too-human phenomenon. First, the story passed down by successive generations increasingly whitewashes and distorts history, so that not turning in one’s family doctor, who was Jewish, as opposed to hiding him, or giving a glass of milk to passing refugees after the war was over, is portrayed as a heroic act of resistance. Second, by separating the evil of Nazism from the good qualities associated with beloved relatives, the respondents managed to distinguish between the “Nazis,” who are “others,” and the “Germans” who were themselves victims of Nazism.

  3. Harbo

    Just a copy of a post I sent to PZM tonight

    Amazing… that the great beard Lawrence Hargrave should be mentioned.
    The great user/developer of box kites who REFUSED Copyright as a infringement of intellectual freedom, and remains unacknowledged by the Wright Brothers.
    Cory Doctorow should know that while we agree with him today, his fight is not new. The use of “intellectual property” as an excuse for censorship is and always will be WRONG.
    This forum hopefully will allow us all to follow THE THREAD together to free thought and open minds.

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