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About

From the New York Times bestselling author of Little Brother, a major novel of the booms, busts, and further booms in store for America

Perry and Lester invent things—seashell robots that make toast, Boogie Woogie Elmo dolls that drive cars. They also invent entirely new economic systems, like the “New Work,” a New Deal for the technological era. Barefoot bankers cross the nation, microinvesting in high-tech communal mini-startups like Perry and Lester’s. Together, they transform the country, and Andrea Fleeks, a journo-turned-blogger, is there to document it.

Then it slides into collapse. The New Work bust puts the dot.combomb to shame. Perry and Lester build a network of interactive rides in abandoned Wal-Marts across the land. As their rides, which commemorate the New Work’s glory days, gain in popularity, a rogue Disney executive grows jealous, and convinces the police that Perry and Lester’s 3D printers are being used to run off AK-47s.

Hordes of goths descend on the shantytown built by the New Workers, joining the cult. Lawsuits multiply as venture capitalists take on a new investment strategy: backing litigation against companies like Disney. Lester and Perry’s friendship falls to pieces when Lester gets the ‘fatkins’ treatment, turning him into a sybaritic gigolo.

Then things get really interesting.


21 Responses to “About”

  1. Social comments and analytics for this post...

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by John Vaccaro: is now ready @doctorow's Makers from his Kindle instead of waiting for the serialization 3X a week! http://bit.ly/123TAr...

  2. Ryan says:

    On this page, there's what I believe is a typo. The "journo-turned-blogger" is named Suzanne Church, if I remember correctly.

  3. Niktia Chudjakov says:

    Fantastic and very inspiring book!!! Thanks a lot.

  4. [...] friend (and former officemate!) Cory Doctorow is launching his latest novel, Makers, tonight at the Toronto Public Library at 239 College Street (east of Spadina). The fun happens in [...]

  5. [...] different with my music because, as Cory Doctorow says in the forward material to his latest book Makers [you can download the e-book  here for free] my problem isn’t piracy, it’s obscurity. [...]

  6. [...] friend (and former officemate!) Cory Doctorow is launching his latest novel, Makers, tonight at the Toronto Public Library at 239 College Street (east of Spadina). The fun happens in [...]

  7. [...] to read Cory Doctrow’s Makers ebook next , there is a ‘fan made’ Kindle version available on the [...]

  8. [...] Cory Doctorow has serialized his new novel, MAKERS, online for free in installments. The print (i.e. paid) version of the book came out in November 2009 before the free installments of the novel finished. I suppose the idea is that if you had been reading the free chapters and got hooked then you could buy the book and find out how it ends. I’ve read the novel and very much enjoyed it. As far as I’ve read, Doctorow thinks that giving away his books for free online has likely been a benefit to him, not to mention others. Doctorow also frequently writes columns and other articles about copyright, DRM and related issues in intellectual property. [...]

  9. [...] Makers by Cory Doctorow: If you want some fiction about innovation, this is a good one to read. An entire sci-fi book about business model innovation – what could be better? [...]

  10. [...] Makers by Cory Doctorow: If you want some fiction about innovation, this is a good one to read. An entire sci-fi book about business model innovation – what could be better? [...]

  11. [...] che stiamo vivendo. Purtroppo sono tutti in inglese ma devo dire che non sono molto complessi. Makers by Cory Doctorow Intertwingle by Judy Breck Unleashing the Ideavirus by Seth Godi Against [...]

  12. [...] If you’ve ever wondered what a book would look like printed out on a till receipt roll, like a digital age On the Road, then ponder no longer. Ben O’Steen has done just that with Cory Doctorow’s latest novel, Makers. [...]

  13. [...] Makers is a fascinating and exciting read. Exciting not in the guns and kabloomy sense, but because of the idea train that started rolling through my head on page one and still hasn’t stopped a few days since finishing the novel. Cory Doctorow has taken a look into our future and presented an opportunistic society, flawed only by the difficulties that confronts those who are smart and creative. The heroes struggle to try and do what they love to do — create — in this world. The heroes are a lovable cast from a reporter who has stepped into the fascinating ‘new work’ movement to the creative tinkerers building and selling bizarre machines to the businessmen attempting to adjust to this new society. At the core the protagonist of the novel, in my opinion, is not any of the characters, but the movement itself — this ‘new work’ — and it is this movement that thrives, dies, and continues on, supported by some characters and threatened by others. [...]

  14. [...] and we’re left with no status, no quo?  Recently, I read Cory Doctorow’s book called The Makers (which by the way is a free download) and it opened my eyes to a world where creation could [...]

  15. [...] Cory Doctorow's Makers had his two tinkerers create a cheap and easy tech that consisted of RFID chips in containers and on objects, so that when you needed to locate something in your closet, you could call it up and the container it was in would glow for you so you could find it faster.  RFID and its intermixing with IPv6, linked data, and object reputation will lead to greater connectedness between the digital and real world, and will enhance our ability to interact with the real by mapping the computational digital world onto it.  It's pretty kludgy the way we look at a real-world object (a book) and then google or amazon it online. [...]

  16. [...] could write a book on the social implications of 3D printing (Cory Doctorow’s Makers novel is one suggestion I’m in the process of reading – and you can download it for [...]

  17. [...] In any case, even if 3-D copy isn’t going to save a world, 3-D intent robbery isn’t going to destroy it either. But this kind of mutating, depraved innovation–and a indeterminate outcome it might have–is what creates a genuine universe some-more engaging than any Cory Doctorow novel. [...]

  18. [...] Cory Doctorow’s book Makers, has come up a lot in discussions I’ve had with UX designers. Within our consumer culture is a push for high-quality commodities and re-purposed products. More is not necessarily better to a growing number of consumers. Less is becoming the intention of consumers who are conscious of the impending hyper over saturation of crap. [...]

  19. [...] new things. (Sadly, this book is nowhere near as good as the novel by Cory Doctorow, also called Makers, which uses the same ideas, but imagines that they combine to make a new economic system, which is [...]

  20. [...] If you’ve ever wondered what a book would look like printed out on a till receipt roll, like a digital age On the Road, then ponder no longer. Ben O’Steen has done just that with Cory Doctorow’s latest novel, Makers. [...]

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