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Podcast

My podcast is a regular feed in which I read from one of my stories for a few minutes at least once a week, from whatever friend's house, airport, hotel, conference, treaty negotiation or what-have-you that I'm currently at. You can get the Podcast through iTunes. Alternatively:

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Podcast files an Oggs, streams, and different bitrate MP3s


How to foil NSA sabotage: use a dead man’s switch (podcast)

In this week's podcast, I read aloud a recent Guardian column, "How to foil NSA sabotage: use a dead man's switch, which proposes a "dead-man's switch" service that'll tip people off when the NSA serves a secret order demanding that Web operators sabotage their systems.

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Interview with South Africa’s Tech Central

I just got back from South Africa's Internet Service Provider Association annual conference, iWeek 13. While there, I sat down with TechCentral's Craig Wilson for an interview (MP3) -- about privacy, the NSA, DRM and the future of the Internet.


Interview with Circulating Ideas library podcast

I did an interview with the Circulating Ideas library podcast (MP3) at the American Library Association conference this year. We talked about information politics, DRM and libraries, my own history with reading and books, and the future of librarianship.


Podcast of “Metadata – a wartime drama”


In the currently installment of my podcast, I read aloud a recent Guardian column, "Metadata – a wartime drama, which imagines a dialog between Alan Turing and Winston Churchill that might have taken place if the UK Home Secretary Theresa May had been Turing's line-manager

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Teaching Computers Shows Us How Little We Understand About Ourselves

In this week's podcast, I read aloud my latest Locus Magazine column, "Teaching Computers Shows Us How Little We Understand About Ourselves":

http://www.locusmag.com/Perspectives/2013/07/cory-doctorow-teaching-computers-shows-us-how-little-we-understand-about-ourselves/

which concerns itself with the ways that we're recklessly formalizing critical elements of human identity such as "names" and "families" for the convenience of corporations and their IT systems and business-models.

"When a programmer instructs a computer to reject, or disregard, all input longer than 64 characters, she effectively makes it impossible for a bureaucrat – however sympathetic – to accommodate a name that’s longer than she’s imagined names might be. With a human bureaucrat, there was always the possibility of wheedling an exception; machines don’t wheedle."

Mastering by John Taylor Williams: wryneckstudio@gmail.com

John Taylor Williams is a audiovisual and multimedia producer based in Washington, DC and the co-host of the Living Proof Brew Cast. Hear him wax poetic over a pint or two of beer by visiting livingproofbrewcast.com. In his free time he makes "Beer Jewelry" and "Odd Musical Furniture." He often "meditates while reading cookbooks."

MP3 link


There’s no way to stop children viewing porn in Starbucks

In honour of the Great Firewall of Cameron -- the UK government's plan to force ISPs to turn on network-level spying and censorship of "adult" material -- I've read aloud There's no way to stop children viewing porn in Starbucks, a column I wrote for the Guardian the last time the UK government floating this idiotic proposal, explaining, comprehensively, why this is such a stupid, stupid idea.

Mastering by John Taylor Williams: wryneckstudio@gmail.com

John Taylor Williams is a audiovisual and multimedia producer based in Washington, DC and the co-host of the Living Proof Brew Cast. Hear him wax poetic over a pint or two of beer by visiting livingproofbrewcast.com. In his free time he makes "Beer Jewelry" and "Odd Musical Furniture." He often "meditates while reading cookbooks."

MP3 link


Interview about kids, hacking and democracy with NPR’s Here and Now

I recently recorded an interview with NPR's "Here and Now" about surveillance, kids, activism, and my novel Homeland. (MP3)


The NSA’s Prism: why we should care

Here's a read-aloud of my recent Guardian column, "The NSA's Prism: why we should care, which sets out the reasons for caring about the recent revelations of bulk, warrantless, suspicionless, indiscriminate surveillance.

Mastering by John Taylor Williams: wryneckstudio@gmail.com

John Taylor Williams is a audiovisual and multimedia producer based in Washington, DC and the co-host of the Living Proof Brew Cast. Hear him wax poetic over a pint or two of beer by visiting livingproofbrewcast.com. In his free time he makes "Beer Jewelry" and "Odd Musical Furniture." He often "meditates while reading cookbooks."

MP3 link


Guardian podcast on publishing with Jonny Geller and Henry Volans

Neil Gaiman's taken over the Guardian's Books Podcast, and had me and agent Jonny Geller and Henry Volans, head of Faber Digital, in the studio for a wide-ranging and awfully fun podcast. The first 20 minutes are a fascinating look at weird London by Damien Walter, and then we kick off with the discussion.

MP3 link


By His Things Shall You Know Him (podcast)

The Institute for the Future commissioned me to write a story about the "Internet of Things," and I wrote them a piece called By His Things Will You Know Him, about death, networks, and computers. It's part of an anthology called "An Aura of Familiarity: Visions from the Coming Age of Networked Matter," which we'll be publishing on Boing Boing in the following weeks. The stories to come are from great authors including Rudy Rucker, Ramez Naam, Bruce Sterling, Madeline Ashby, and Warren Ellis.

I read the story aloud for my podcast last week, and have been awaiting the chance to publish it -- now that it's live, here you are!

MP3 link


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